MOBILISASI DINI DI ICU

Authors

  • Andie Muhari Departemen Anestesi dan Terapi Intensif RS dr Hasan Sadikin/Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Padjadjaran
  • Suwarman Departemen Anestesi dan Terapi Intensif RS dr Hasan Sadikin/Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Padjadjaran
  • Ezra Oktaliansah Departemen Anestesi dan Terapi Intensif RS dr Hasan Sadikin/Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Padjadjaran
  • Ruli H Sitanggang Departemen Anestesi dan Terapi Intensif RS dr Hasan Sadikin/Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Padjadjaran

Keywords:

mobilization, rehabilitation

Abstract

Early mobilisation and rehabilitation of patients in the intensive care unit must be done as early as possible. Patients mobilisation in the intensive care unit is a basic nursing action and performed based on clinical decision. The long term sequelae, including ICU-acquired muscle weakness, occurs in almost 50% of prolonged intensive care patients, and is associated with further decreased quality of life. Prolonged bedridden accelerates the risk of muscle atrophy. Therefore, early mobilisation can speed up recovery, reduce ICU length of stay, prevent repeated ICU treatment, and increase survival rate. Early mobilisation and physical rehabilitation are performed gradually starting from bed activities, sitting, standing, and walking. Functional assessment in the intensive care unit includes body function, muscle strength, muscle mass, mobility function, and quality of life. Physiotherapy should be done in the intensive care unit to optimize cardiopulmonary and physical function. Physiotherapists need to follow, evaluate, and provide therapy from the acute phase to the rehabilitation phase.

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Published

2020-12-24

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